In Our Memory & Hearts Forever, Elizabeth Taylor

by Elisabet

Lipstick for the pool! Taylor gets ready for a dip in a curve-skimming one-piece in 1949. From MPTV.

Today during lunch at school, I found out the sad news that Elizabeth Taylor, screen legend, two-time Academy Award winner for Best Actress, and Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire, died today, March 23, 2011, at age 79 at Cedars-Sinai hospital in Los Angeles. She died in peace, surrounded by her four children. Other than her notable movie roles, “Liz” Taylor was also known for her multiple marriages, surely that’s one thing I associated her with when I heard her name. However, despite her multiple marriages, and lifestyle, to me she was, and will always  be one of the few proper women, a true lady; she was a stylish woman. The CNN.com article about Elizabeth Taylor’s death, “Elizabeth Taylor dead at 79” perfectly describes the woman who was known for much more than being an actress:

Though a two-time Oscar winner — for “Butterfield 8” (1960) and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” (1966) — Taylor was more celebrated for simply being Elizabeth Taylor: sexy, glamorous, tempestuous, fragile, always trailing courtiers, media and fans. She wasn’t above playing to that image — she had a fragrance called “White Diamonds” — or mocking it.

Languidly draped in off-the-shoulder lace, 1954. From Baron/Getty Images.

Languidly draped in off-the-shoulder lace, 1954. From Baron/Getty Images.

An MGM head shot of the young actress, in a lively print gown, taken in 1951. From MPTV.

I remember sometimes I would buy her perfumes for my mother; my mother loved Elizabeth Taylor, and regarded her as one of the great actresses. The first Elizabeth Taylor movie that I saw was Black Velvet. Still today, it is one of my favorite movies ever, mainly because of the horses and because of Elizabeth Taylor. I remember watching that film with another equestrian friend of mine, and we would just be there, imagining Taylor’s life and how fantastic it may have been, and how cool it probably was to do Black Velvet. To me, she represented glamour to the best.

She surely will never be forgotten, at least not by my, and not by anyone who understands what a real, classy lady is. ♥

An Easter egg in the ivy, 1961. From MPTV.

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[VanityFair.com]

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